• Talking History with Our Cleveland Brain Injury Lawyer: The Case of Phineas Gage

    Posted on June 29th, 2017 admin No comments

    Why does modern brain science owe its very existence to an 1800s era railroad worker? As our brain injury lawyer in Cleveland points out, the case of Phineas Gage led to some fundamental revelations on the nature of the brain, and is often used as a reference point for further discovery.

    While blowing up rocks to clear the way for new railway lines, Gage set off a metal spark that in turn drove a tamping iron up and out of the hole, through his left cheek, behind his eye socket, and out of the top of his head. Gage didn’t die, but most of the frontal lobe of his brain was destroyed.

    The injury led to dramatic changes in Gage’s personality.

    “He is fitful, irreverent, indulging at times in the grossest profanity, which was not previously his custom,” wrote John Martyn Harlow, the physician who treated Gage after the accident.

    Laying the Foundation of a New Science

    As a recent article in NPR points out, Gage’s case led to the development of modern brain science. “If you talk about hard core neurology and the relationship between structural damage to the brain and particular changes in behavior, this is ground zero,” Allan Ropper, a neurologist at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, told NPR. “It’s one region [of the brain], it’s really obvious, and the changes in personality were stunning.”

    Healing and Time

    The good news? The personality change was temporary, lasting likely only two to three years. Gage went onto work as a long-distance stagecoach driver in Chile, which requires a good deal of focus and planning capabilities.

    “Even in cases of massive brain damage and massive incapacity, rehabilitation is always possible,” Malcolm Macmillan, an honorary professor at the Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, told NPR.

    That’s inspiring news for the clients of a brain injury attorney in Cleveland. It may take patience, but time and hard work in rehabilitation will ultimately heal the wound and life goes on.

  • Believe Your Cleveland Birth Injury Attorney: Birth Can Be Especially Traumatic

    Posted on June 20th, 2017 admin No comments

    Suffer from a traumatic birth? You’re not alone. As any birth injury attorney in Cleveland will tell you, birth is difficult and a surprising number of mothers suffer from  posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTS) after birth, including some with full blown  posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    In fact, Lamaze International’s Listening to Mothers Survey II found that 9 percent of new mothers suffered from PTSD after their birth, while a full 18 percent suffered from PTS. Furthermore, ethnicity can have a profound effect on the numbers. Indeed, more than 1 out of 4 non-Hispanic black mothers suffered from some form of PTS after birth.

    “The high percentage of mothers with elevated posttraumatic stress symptoms is a sobering statistic,” the study’s authors noted.

    Birth: Psychologically More Traumatic than Terrorism?

    Perhaps more surprising, giving birth can be statistically more disturbing psychologically than surviving a terrorist attack. Health psychologist and international certified lactation consultant Kathleen Kendall-Tackett points out in a blog on Women’s Health Today:

    “In the weeks following September 11, 7.5% of the residents of lower Manhattan met those full criteria (Galea et al. 2003). Take a minute to absorb these statistics. In at least one large study, the rates of full-criteria PTSD in the U.S. following childbirth are now higher than those following a major terrorist attack.”

    The outcome may be a bundle of joy that is also the light of your life, but birth can be difficult. If you suffered from a difficult birth, make sure you have the resources you need, including medical, legal and financial. Talk to a Linton Law Firm birth injury attorney in Cleveland for a free consultation.

    Read more here.

  • Ask a Nursing Home Injury Attorney in Cleveland: Why is Ohio’s Care so Bad?

    Posted on June 2nd, 2017 admin No comments

    It’s a sobering yet logical conclusion for any nursing home injury attorney in Cleveland: Why do Ohio’s nursing homes rate among the lowest in the nation when it comes to quality care, as measured by federal statistics?

    Simple. There’s just not enough staff.

    “Almost always, we had to work short-handed, handling anywhere from 15 to 20 people at any given time,” former nurse’s aide Lolly wrote in a Cleveland Plain Dealer anonymous survey of the state’s caregivers. “It is impossible to give proper care to that many people, answer the call lights and be everywhere at the same time.”

    The Results? Tragic…

    Not having enough hands on deck can cause extremely dangerous accidents that easily result in tragedy. As one sad example, Susanne Lawrence, a resident of Normandy Manor in Rocky River, overdosed after being given 20 times the prescribed dosage of oxycodone, or 500 milligrams. Staff failed to read the medication’s label and the 83 year old died after her last dosage on July 7, 2015.

    Deadly Math

    The statistics and the extent of the crisis are shocking, even for a nursing home injury attorney in Cleveland who deals with them every day. After three months of research, the Plain Dealer discovered:

    • “Nearly 41 percent of the facilities in Ohio earned a below-average rating of one or two stars on the federal Nursing Home Compare standard, as of Dec. 1, compared to 35 percent nationally.
    • At least 31 Ohio nursing home deaths in the last three years were attributed by authorities to issues of care. Residents’ lawyers argue the number could be far higher, because they depend upon self-reporting by nursing homes.
    • Ohio’s minimum staffing rules are relatively lenient. Facilities in the state are required to make available 2.5 hours a day of nursing staff time for each resident. Florida and California require much more.
    • Ohio requires only 75 hours of training for the aides who provide much of the care in a nursing facility. California requires 150 hours.
    • Many states have given themselves the ability to fine nursing homes that violate “their standards. In places like California, state fines are used to strengthen nursing home inspections. Ohio doesn’t fine nursing homes. Instead, it recommends a dollar amount to the federal government, which sets and collects the fines. A portion of the fines is returned to the state.”

    If you have a loved one in a residential care facility in Ohio, talk to a lawyer to ensure they are getting the best care. If statistics are any indication, their quality of life, if not their very lives themselves, may be in your hands. Contact us for a free consultation.