• Cleveland Brain Injury Lawyer: Could COVID-19 Result in Brain Damage?

    Posted on June 29th, 2020 admin No comments

    COVID-19 can be a deadly and debilitating disease, and there is much scientists need to learn about it. But new research indicates certain patients treated for COVID-19 exhibit clinical and neurochemical signs of brain injury.

    COVID-19 may not just be a serious medical pandemic affecting our community but may concern brain injury lawyers in Cleveland advocating for the legal rights of their clients.

    In fact, finding and measuring a blood-based biomarker for brain damage proved to be possible in even moderate COVID-19 cases.

    Though it is not common, people who become severely ill with COVID-19 and require hospital treatment show obvious signs of brain impairment.

    Medical Xpress reports:

    “In a project at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, blood samples were taken from 47 patients with mild, moderate, and severe COVID-19 in the course of their hospital stay. These samples were analyzed by means of highly sensitive biomarkers for brain injury. The results were compared with those from a healthy control group comprising 33 people matched by age and sex.”

    An Increase the GFAP Biomarker

    Brain injury was found after an increase in the biomarker known as GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein). GFAP is normally present in astrocytes, a star-shaped neuron-supportive cell type in the brain, but leaks out in the event of astrocytic injury or over-activation. A brain injury could be detected even in some patients who had been admitted to a hospital but not placed on a ventilator.

    “The increase in NfL levels, in particular, over time is greater than we’ve seen previously in studies connected with intensive care, and this suggests that COVID-19 can in fact directly bring about a brain injury. Whether it’s the virus or the immune system that’s causing this is unclear at present, and more research is needed,” stated Henrik Zetterberg, Professor of Neurochemistry, whose research team at Sahlgrenska Academy performed the measurements.

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